IN AN ENDLESS AND UNPREDICTABLE STREAM OF ARTIFICIAL LIFE WHERE ARE YOU?

AFTER TECHNOLOGICAL SINGULARITY, WHO ARE GODS? WHO ARE THEIR (OR OUR) GHOSTS?
HITO STEYERL

Liquidity, Inc. (2014) HD Video file, single channel in architectural environment; 30.00 min, sound
Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York
100 TONSON GALLERY Hito Steyerl is fascinated by the digital technologies used to make and circulate these images around the world. She pushes the boundary of traditional video, often obscuring what is real beneath many layers of metaphors and satirical humor. In her work, she has addressed the wide–ranging effects of today’s mass proliferation and dissemination of images, issues of surveillance migration and militarization, and the evolving functions of technology in our networked culture.
A suggested by the title, this video installation titled Liquidity Inc. uses water as its guiding theme. The story takes as a point of departure the story of Jacob Wood, a former financial analyst who lost his job during the 2008 economic recession and decided to turn his hobby in mixed martial arts into a career. Steyerl follows actor and martial artist Bruce Lee’s dictum to “be shapeless, formless, like water,” turning “liquidity” into a trope fluid enough to speak about everything from the weather to water as material resource, to the circulation of information and assets. Projected onto a screen in front of a wave–like ramp structure, Liquidity Inc. is a captivating parable of economic crisis and contemporary culture that is by turns playful and poignant.

HITO STEYERL Liquidity, Inc. (2014) HD Video file, single channel in architectural environment; 30.00 min, sound
Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York
100 TONSON GALLERY As our technology, financial system and representational system becomes more liquid and flexible, the laws that exist to govern us becomes more rigid and disabling. Is it possible to make laws and policies that still governs this liquidity?

Military and Capitalism are invisible, the systems are usually invisible so they can invisibly control us, how to deal with this powerful invisibility? Be like them, be like water?
Hito Steyerl is fascinated by the digital technologies used to make and circulate these images around the world. She pushes the boundary of traditional video, often obscuring what is real beneath many layers of metaphors and satirical humor. In her work, she has addressed the wide–ranging effects of today’s mass proliferation and dissemination of images, issues of surveillance migration and militarization, and the evolving functions of technology in our networked culture.
A suggested by the title, this video installation titled Liquidity Inc. uses water as its guiding theme. The story takes as a point of departure the story of Jacob Wood, a former financial analyst who lost his job during the 2008 economic recession and decided to turn his hobby in mixed martial arts into a career. Steyerl follows actor and martial artist Bruce Lee’s dictum to “be shapeless, formless, like water,” turning “liquidity” into a trope fluid enough to speak about everything from the weather to water as material resource, to the circulation of information and assets. Projected onto a screen in front of a wave–like ramp structure, Liquidity Inc. is a captivating parable of economic crisis and contemporary culture that is by turns playful and poignant.